Thursday, July 26, 2018

A Noise Downstairs by Linwood Barclay

 
Typewriter sounds are almost non-existent today, but they kept recurring in Paul’s home and seemed to be coming from the typewriter that his wife had bought him.



After Paul followed his friend because he was driving erratically, he found something horrific and unbelievable.



Paul saw dead bodies in his colleague’s trunk and when Kenneth struck him to silence him, he thought it was all over.  Thankfully Paul didn’t die, and Kenneth was imprisoned.  



Another thing happened as Paul was following Kenneth. He saw Kenneth dispose of a typewriter in a dumpster.  Could that be the same typewriter that Kenneth forced his victims to use to type an apology before he killed them and the typewriter that Paul's wife bought for him at a yard sale?

When we do "meet" this, typewriter, bizarre things begin to happen.


THE NOISE DOWNSTAIRS has us following Paul as he is recovering from his physical injury caused by the strike with the shovel as well as the emotional trauma.



Mr. Barclay keeps the tension high, and the story line is intriguing. The ending twists were well hidden from the reader.



The introduction of the typewriter was very clever, and the typewriter seemed to be included as another character. 



This was my first book by Mr. Barclay, and I thoroughly enjoyed it.



If you have enjoyed Mr. Barclay's books, you won't want to miss his newest.   5/5

This book was given to me as ARC by the publisher and NetGalley. All opinions are my own.

10 comments:

  1. This sounds really interesting. I love typewriters, and I'm sure the clicking sound could be used to create a creepy effect.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh...I LOVE typewriters too. :)

      The book was very good.

      Thanks for commenting, Tizzy.

      Delete
  2. I thought that was blinds on the cover until you mentioned a typewriter. I think I'd like this book!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A typing teacher can always "spy" typewriter parts. :)

      Thanks for commenting, Kathy.

      Delete
  3. Oh wow! I need to read this. Great review!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, reeca. :)

      I think you will enjoy the book.

      Thanks for commenting.

      Delete
  4. Ooh, I've been wanting to read this book...the sound of a typewriter is especially creepy, since we seldom see or hear them anymore. I downloaded this book on Tuesday.

    Thanks for sharing! Great review.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh yes....loved the typewriter.

      ENJOY when you read the book, Laurel.

      Thanks for commenting.

      Delete
  5. I checked my shelves and see that I have several of Linwood's books in paperback, all stacked neatly in chronological order, but none of them actually read yet!

    Why/ Who knows! I guess my theory is that I will get to them one day!

    I only ever managed rudimentary typing lessons and never did manage 'The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog', the way it was meant to be typed. There was always something satisfying about the definite click of the keys as they hit the ribbon though.

    The thought that the typewriter could start up all on its own though, is a whole new phenomenon that could keep you awake at night if you let it. Are the victims actually in Paul's house on his machine and he doesn't know it, or is the killer just playing mind games with him?

    I am definitely going to have to get some of those early boks down off the shelf and dust them off.

    Happy Reading :)

    Yvonne
    xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love the sound of typewriter keys clicking and especially when the type bars get stuck. :)

      You’ll have to read the book to find out how the typewriter is “typing” on its own or with the help of someone. :)

      Thanks for commenting, Yvonne.

      Delete